A Firm Stance Against Corrosive Environments

Sulzer develops heat treatment procedure to strengthen pumps.


Published:

Pumping corrosive fluids containing abrasive solids is a challenge. To face this challenge, Sulzer has developed a specific heat treatment procedure for steel that improves wear resistance, while leaving corrosion resistance nearly unchanged.

There are several pumps that can operate in corrosive and abrasive environments, such as chemical or metal processes and wastewater treatment. To ensure high reliability, research and development in the fields of fluid mechanics and materials technology, as well as detailed knowledge of the applications and operating conditions, are essential, Sulzer said.

Hydroabrasive wear and corrosion can significantly reduce the lifetime of pump components. One possibility to optimize operational life in such aggressive surroundings is the use of specially adapted hydraulics or seals. Furthermore, the selection of appropriate materials is the key to ...

Archive »Recent Articles

Compressor Station’s Waste Heat Captured

ElectraTherm has partnered with ConocoPhillips to capture waste heat from a compression station at Cessford, Alberta, and generate 90kWe of electricity.

Energy Efficiency Criteria Coming for Compressors

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to establish energy efficiency standards for new natural gas compressors as part of a program to reduce methane leaks from natural gas pipelines.

U.S. Gas Injections at Record Pace

EIA said that nearly midway through the summer storage injection season (the beginning of April through the end of October), it projects a record build of 2.6 Tcf (73 x 109 m3) will bring stocks to 3.4 Tcf (96 x 109 m3) by the beginning of winter.

Natgas Rides Tight Oil Drilling Boom

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has reported that although the number of natural gas-directed drilling rigs is particularly low at 250 rotaries, gas production has grown 5% year-over-year.

SwRI to Develop Linear Motor Recip

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has received a US$1.8 million contract from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop, build and test a linear motor reciprocating compressor (LMRC).