Canada Tightens Emissions from Stationary Engines

New Rules Follow Similar Action in U.S.


Published:

The Canadian government has announced mandatory emission standards for major industries, including the stationary engines used to drive gas compressors.

The regulation also affects air pollution from boilers, heaters and cement kilns. It brings Canada’s air quality rules closer to those issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq said the resulting reduction of nitrogen oxides in the air would be equivalent to removing four million cars from the road.

Nitrogen oxide emissions from regulated stationary engines are expected to be cut 1.8 million tonnes (4 billion lb) between 2013 and 2035. This is almost twice the volume of NOx that Canada’s entire mobile fleet — cars, trucks, planes, trains, tractors and other industrial equipment — emitted in 2011.

Environment Canada economists said between 2013 to 2035, the net health benefits to Canadians resulting from regulating emissions from gas-fired engines would be C$6.5 billion.

The government collaborated during the past few years with representatives from provinces, territories, industry and non-government organizations to lay the foundation for the requirements in the new regulations.

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