Pennsylvania Township Okays Smaller Compressor Station

Snyder Brothers project approved after XTO’s plans were rejected


Published:

Two days after denying a request from XTO Energy to build a natural gas compressor station on the McIntyre Farm in South Buffalo, Pennsylvania, township officials have approved a smaller proposal from Snyder Brothers.

The compressor station would be built on farmland near Ford City Road and Grandview Drive.

The Snyder Brothers’ proposal has one compressor, compared with XTO Energy’s four, and would be built 2000 ft. (610 m) from homes on Grandview Drive over a hill. XTO’s station would have been 500 to 1000 ft. (152 to 305 m) from the homes.

Snyder Brothers said the compressor station will boost the low pressure of gas gathered from its wells and deliver it into the Midstream Services gas transmission line that crosses Western Pennsylvania.

Carl Rose, Snyder Brothers’ construction supervisor, said the compressor would be driven by a Caterpillar engine and housed in a 50 ft. wide, 50 ft. long, 30 ft. high (15 m wide, 15 m long, 9 m high) building, lined with sound-dampening materials.

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